The Lion in Winter

Decmber 5th thru December 20th, 2014

by James Goldman, Directed by Scott Albert Bennett

It is Christmas in England AD 1183, and the King of France, Philip II Augustus, is at the court of Henry II. Henry has let his wife Eleanor out of prison, but only for the holidays, and with the fate of Henry's empire at stake, everybody engages in their own brand of deception and treachery to stake their claim.



A delightful blend of both the comedic and the dramatic, we follow the personal and political conflicts of King Henry II, his wife Eleanor of Aquitaine, their three surviving sons Richard, Geoffrey and John, and Philip's half-sister Alais, betrothed to Richard at age eight, but now Henry's mistress. As Eleanor says, "Every family has its ups and downs," and this royal family is no exception.

Twelfth Night

February 13th thru March 7th, 2015

by William Shakespeare, Directed by Greg Harris

William Shakespeare's Twelfth Night, or What You Will is a comedy about a cross-dressing, ship-wreck surviving, poetry-loving girl who finds herself at the center of a not-so-average love triangle.

Believed to have been written around 1601–02 as a Twelfth Night's entertainment for the close of the Christmas season, the play centers on the twins Viola and Sebastian, who are separated in a shipwreck. The play focuses on the Countess Olivia falling in love with Viola (who is disguised as a boy), and Sebastian in turn falling in love with Olivia.

Death of a Salesman

April 24th thru May 26th, 2015

by Arthur Miller, Directed by Jeff Knupp

Arthur Miller's Pulitzer Prize winning play of 1949 is widely considered to a cornerstone of American letters. A caustic attack on the "American Dream" of materialism, Death of a Salesman is a three-act play (two acts and a "requiem"), centering on the main character, Willy Loman.

At age sixty-three, Willy has been a traveling salesman all his life. Despite his hard work and grueling schedule, the Lomans have always lived on the edge of poverty and Willy has always been an underling in his company. Yet Willy constantly tells himself and his family that the "big break" he deserves is just around the corner. He has raised his two sons, Biff and Happy, to also believe that somehow life has cheated them and insists that one day they will get their due. Linda, Willy's dutiful wife, lives under the thin veneer of denial that her husband has so long tried to keep from collapsing.

Willy finds that because of changing economic conditions the company has no further need for his services. Willy is devastated and is unable to understand how his employer could just cast him aside after so many years of faithful service. In Act 1, Willy states his work ethic clearly when he says that a man who makes his appearance in the business world is the man who gets ahead. Willy’s old boss has died, leaving his son the company. The new owner sees Willy as having outlived his usefulness to the company. Willy is terminated and soon discovers that he is unable to find other similar employment.